City of Reno
Nevada

Staff Report - Planning Commission
8699

Staff Report (For Possible Action): Case No. LDC18-00010 (Esplanade at Northgate) - A request has been made for: 1) a tentative map for 48 condominium units; and 2) special use permits for: a) condominium development with more than four units; b) hillside development; and c) grading that results in cuts deeper than 20 feet and fills greater than ten feet. The ±6.21 acre site is located on the west side of Beaumont Parkway near its intersection with Threewood Lane within the Multifamily Residential – 14 dwelling units per acre/McQueen Neighborhood Plan (MF14/MQ) zone. The site has a Master Plan land use designation of Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Mixed Residential 14 to 21 dwelling units per acre. jdb

Information

Department:Community Development - Planning & EngineeringSponsors:
Category:Tentative MapWards:Ward 5

Staff Report Formal Body

Ward #:

5

Case No.:

LDC18-00010 (Esplanade at Northgate)

Applicant:

Northgate 2016, LLC

APN Number:

208-610-01

Request:

A request has been made for: 1) a tentative map for 48 condominium units; and 2) special use permits for: a) condominium development with more than four units; b) hillside development; and c) grading that results in cuts deeper than 20 feet and fills greater than ten feet.

Location:

The ±6.21 acre site is located on the west side of Beaumont Parkway near its intersection with Threewood Lane within the Multifamily Residential – 14 dwelling units per acre/McQueen Neighborhood Plan (MF14/MQ) zone.  The site has a Master Plan land use designation of Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Mixed Residential 14 to 21 dwelling units per acre.

Proposed Motion:

Based upon compliance with the applicable findings, I move to approve the tentative map and special use permit, subject to conditions.

 

Recommended Conditions of Approval:

 

All conditions shall be met to the satisfaction of Community Development Department staff, unless otherwise noted.

 

1.                   The project shall comply with all applicable City codes, plans, reports, materials, etc., as submitted.  In the event of a conflict between said plans, reports, materials and City codes, City codes in effect at the time the application is submitted, shall prevail.

2.                   The applicant shall record the final map in accordance with the time limit contained in state law or this approval shall be null and void.

3.                   The applicant shall attach a copy of the final approval letter to any and all building permit applications.

4.                   The applicant, developer, builder, property or business owner, as applicable, shall continuously maintain a copy of this approval letter on the project site during the construction and operation of the project/business.  The project approval letter shall be posted or readily available upon demand by City staff.

5.                   Hours of construction shall be limited to 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday.  There shall be no construction on Sundays.  This condition shall not apply to dust control operations.

6.                   Prior to the approval of a final map, the applicant shall demonstrate that all private yard areas will be shown as limited common elements (LCE). All LCE’s shall contain clear requirements in the CC&R’s, including, but not limited to, use restrictions, maintenance requirements, landscape requirements, and fencing restrictions. No accessory structures shall be allowed in the LCE.

7.                   Prior to the issuance of a building permit for any site improvements, the applicant shall submit landscape plans showing clusters of evergreen trees planted at an average rate of one per 15 lineal feet along the slopes on the north and south boundary of the developed portion of the site.  The trees shall be strategically placed to provide maximum coverage of the slopes.  All tree species shall have a large tree canopy at maturity and shall be a minimum of ten feet at planting.  Trees shall be installed prior to the certificate of occupancy of the first building. 

8.                   Prior to the issuance of a building permit for any site improvements, the applicant shall submit landscape plans showing large shrubs (minimum five gallon) will be placed along the western boundary of the project. 

9.                   Prior to the issuance of a building permit for any site improvements, the applicant shall submit landscape plans that demonstrate the tree species in the existing surrounding developments will be matched to ensure neighborhood consistency. 

10.              Prior to the issuance of a building permit for any site improvements, the applicant shall submit landscape plans that demonstrate trees will be planted in the existing median at a rate of one tree per 30 lineal feet and six shrubs per tree.

11.              Prior to the approval of a final map, the developer shall enter into an agreement with the Castle Rock Home Owner’s Association (HOA) to transfer responsibility of the median maintenance along the project frontage to the HOA for the proposed project.  All common areas within the proposed development shall be maintained by a HOA.  Each final map shall clearly designate maintenance responsibilities. 

12.              Prior to the approval of a final map, the applicant shall submit site improvement permits showing all units with a single car garage and no driveway will have clearly assigned surface parking spaces. 

13.              Prior to the approval of a final map, the applicant shall submit a wall and fence plan that demonstrates all fences abutting dedicated open space areas and abutting Beaumont Parkway will be open view.  All open view fences shall be designed to be consistent with the open view fences in the adjacent developments.

14.              Prior to issuance of a grading permit, the applicant shall submit final grading plans demonstrating that the edges of all created cut and fill slopes will be feathered and rounded to properly transition into the adjacent undisturbed slopes. All created slopes exceeding 30 feet in height shall provide horizontal and vertical changes to vary the flat-engineered look to these slopes by incorporating a mixture of 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 slope.  Talus slopes, embedded boulders, rockery walls or other similar methods can also be used to break up these slopes.  All areas disturbed by project grading shall be revegetated with a seed mix consistent with the adjacent undisturbed slopes.  A note shall be added to each grading sheet as follows

GRADING NOTE: UPON COMPLETION OF THE GRADING AND PRIOR TO APPLICATION OF REVEGETATION MATERIALS, REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE DEVELOPER, THE CONTRACTOR, THE ENGINEER OF RECORD AND THE CITY OF RENO SHALL MEET ON THE SITE TO DETERMINE THE FINAL SLOPE GRADING AND SLOPE TREATEMENTS (PER CONDITION NO. 11 OF LDC18-00010 – ESPLANADE AT NORTHGATE).

15.              Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the site improvements, the applicant shall submit plans demonstrating that all retaining walls will be decorative, including, but not limited to rockery walls or retaining wall systems with the appearance of random-pattern, hand-stacked, natural stone.

16.              Prior to the issuance of any building permit for retaining walls on the site, the applicant shall submit plans demonstrating the walls will be contoured to match the surrounding topography and provide visual interest. 

17.              Prior to the approval of any final map containing areas designated as open space, the applicant shall demonstrate that all open space areas will be designated as permanent open space on the map.  The applicant shall deed restrict all open space areas to remain as open space in perpetuity.

18.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall provide any necessary on-site and off-site easements for construction, access, sewer lines, storm drains, and utility improvements, and shall construct all required access, sewer, storm drain, and utility improvements prior to the issuance of any certificate of occupancy.

19.              Prior to the issuance of each permit or approval of each final map, the applicant shall ensure that all easements which encumber the project site are relinquished or relocated appropriately.

20.              Prior to the issuance of each permit or approval of each final map, the plans shall demonstrate that public sanitary sewer mains and storm drains will be constructed within the primary street and private alley sections and include appropriate easements.

21.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall provide a copy of the water “will-serve” letter.

22.              Prior to the issuance of each permit or approval of each final map, the applicant shall submit a final Hydrology Report and Sewerage Report in accordance with the Public Works Design Manual.

23.              Prior to the issuance of each permit or approval of each final map, the applicant shall submit a final geotechnical report that meets or exceeds the requirements of the Public Works Design Manual (PWDM).

24.              Prior to the issuance of each permit or approval of each final map, the applicant shall submit street improvement plans that meet or exceed the City of Reno PWDM standards. Where utilities are tied to existing infrastructure located in Beaumont Parkway, the developer will be responsible for replacing roadway markings and striping affected or displaced by the pavement improvements prior to the approval of any certificate of occupancy.

25.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall develop an operations and maintenance manual for the detention pond, drainage swales, and all storm drains located in alleys.  The operations and maintenance manual shall include, but not be limited to, detailed operations and maintenance tasks, frequency of maintenance, access for maintenance, and a detailed description of the type(s) of equipment which are anticipated to be necessary for the operations and maintenance tasks.  This manual shall be submitted to the Community Development Engineering Staff with the site improvement permit.  This Manual shall also be adopted as policy by the Home Owners Association (HOA) or equivalent entity responsible for storm drainage for the development.

26.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall apply for a City of Reno storm water permit to address storm water pollution prevention on the project site

27.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall submit plans that demonstrate adequate gravity flow and overland escape routes are provided for all roof-top and surface storm water collection and conveyance facilities in accordance with the PWDM.

28.              Prior to the approval of the first final map, the applicant shall provide site improvement plans with a detailed design for a pork chop island on the project site to prevent left turn movements out of the project site onto Beaumont Parkway.  Site improvement plans shall also show the installation of two radar speed signs on Beaumont Parkway, one in each direction of travel.  The porkchop and radar speed signs shall be installed prior to the issuance of the first Certificate of Occupancy. 

29.              Prior to the approval of the first final map, the applicant shall demonstrate that all streets and alleys in the proposed development are designated private and are placed on a separate common area parcel meeting all code requirements for easements for private streets. 

30.              Prior to the approval of each final map, the applicant shall submit plans which include parking control signs and red painted curb along the post curb side of the private primary street through the development.  Additionally, the applicant shall include provisions in the CC&Rs to prohibit parking on one side of the private primary street.

31.              Prior to the issuance of each permit, the applicant shall submit a construction management and access plan.  This plan shall address project phasing, including utilities and infrastructure, and shall demonstrate adequate access to adjacent properties will be perpetuated and maintained during construction. 

32.              Prior to the approval of a final map, the applicant shall complete a safe routes to school audit in coordination with the Washoe County School District Police Department.  All recommendations arising from said audit shall be considered by the applicant in the design of their final improvement plans.

Background:  A tentative map and special use permit to develop 18 single family lots was approved in November of 2003 (LDC04-00122).  No final map was ever recorded and the ±6.21 acre project site remains vacant.  The applicant is proposing to develop 48 condominium units in 16 buildings (Exhibits A and F).  The Reno Municipal Code (RMC) allows for condominiums with the approval of a site plan review (SPR) application (RMC Table 18.08-5 – Uses Permitted in Nonresidential Base Zoning Districts).  A tentative map application is required for subdividing a parcel into five or more lots.  Special use permits (SUP) are required for the proposed hillside development and grading (cuts deeper than 20 feet and fills in excess of ten feet).  The applicant has elected to elevate the SPR for the condominium use to a SUP in order to concurrently process the applications, as allowed per RMC 18.06.407(c)(4) – (Alternative Process).

 

Analysis:

 

Land Use Compatibility:  Land uses surrounding the site consist of single family residences located to the north; the former Northgate Golf Course located to the west and south; and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) temple located to the east.  Both the subject site and the LDS temple are located within the Multifamily – 14 units per acre (MF14) zone.  The existing single family detached residences located to the north are located within the Single Family Residential – 9,000 square foot (SF9) zone.  All other surrounding properties are located within the Open Space (OS) zone.  Based on the zoning designation and the hillside development restriction, a total of ±57 units would be allowed on the subject property and 48 are proposed.  The proposed density is ±8.97 dwelling units per acre (du/ac), when 14 du/ac is allowed in the underlying zone.  This decrease in density will provide for a project that is compatible with the existing surrounding uses and the topography of the site. 

 

Because the proposed project is located within the MF14 zone and is adjacent to single family zoned property, it is required to meet the code required residential adjacency standards for building setbacks, signs, light spillover, and noise (RMC 18.12.304 – Residential Adjacency Standards).  A photometric plan was prepared to ensure that there will be no more than 0.5 foot candle of spillover light at the nearest single family zoned property line.  With the grade change, the proposed placement of lights below the existing residences, and the requirements for directing the light downward, light glare is not anticipated to be an impact to surrounding residences.  The height of the proposed buildings will fall significantly below the code required height to setback ratio as demonstrated in Exhibit G.  Given that the use is residential in nature, the anticipated noise generated by the project will be similar to the existing residential neighborhood located to the north.  An acoustical analysis was provided showing the project will not be an increase to the existing base ambient noise level and will be consistent with the existing residential uses in the area.  No signs are proposed on any of the buildings. As proposed and conditioned, the project will be compatible with the surrounding uses and will not create any adverse environmental impacts which would be detrimental or cause a nuisance to area properties (SUP findings a and f).

 

Urban/Environmental Design:  The proposed project is generally oriented around a short street extending from Beaumont Parkway and ending in a cul-de-sac.  Each building contains two private yard areas.  A condition is recommended to designate these areas as limited common elements (LCE) with clear assignment to a particular unit.  The CC&R’s should contain specific requirements for responsibilities for these limited common elements, including, but not limited to, maintenance, landscape, restriction of fencing type, etc. (Condition No. 6).  All garages are oriented toward private alleys with the exception of Buildings No. 3 and 9.  This ensures that garages will not dominate the streetscape along Beaumont Parkway or the proposed Street A.  The proposed architecture is contemporary with Italianate and Spanish characteristics (Exhibit E).  The design incorporates a variety of roof planes, pop outs and recesses, unique decorative features, and the use of varied materials and colors.  Prior to any building permits for the proposed building, the applicant will be required to demonstrate that code required articulation is provided on all sides of each building.  The maximum height of each of the proposed buildings is ±24 feet and no building is greater than two stories.  This is consistent with several two story structures in the subdivision located to the north (SUP finding e).  With the proposed grade change between the abutting properties and the subject site, the proposed buildings will be situated ±20 feet lower than the existing residences.  Therefore, the proposed window placement on the proposed structures will have no impact on the privacy of the existing residences located to the north (SUP finding h).

 

Out of the ±6.21 acre site, ±3.9 acres of the site are being developed.  The remainder of the site is mostly undevelopable slopes which will be dedicated as open space.  The proposed project will meet the landscape requirement of 20% of the developed portion of the site (±34,002 square feet) (Exhibit D).  A minimum of ±114 trees and ±684 shrubs are required and will be provided.  Further, the applicant is proposing to save ±35 existing mature trees throughout the site.  If trees are removed, the applicant will be subject to the tree removal penalty requirements and additional trees will be required.  The existing landscaping on the slope along the northern boundary of the project site provides a significant visual buffer of the project site for the abutting residential properties.  In addition to the existing trees along the slope, a condition is recommended to have clusters of large canopy evergreen tree species planted on this same slope to increase the screening of the project.  This condition will also be applicable to the slope along the southern project boundary to soften the visual impact of the proposed retaining walls and blend the proposed project with the surrounding natural environment (Condition No. 7).  In addition to buffering the north and southern boundary, a condition is recommended to require the planting of large shrubs along the west property boundary (Condition No. 8).  An additional condition is recommended to match the tree species in the existing surrounding developments to create a consistent neighborhood character amongst all developments in the vicinity (Condition No. 9). Landscaping will be required in the existing median at a rate of one tree per 30 lineal feet and six shrubs per tree (Condition No. 10). The developer should work with the Castle Rock Home Owner’s Association (HOA) to transfer responsibility of median maintenance along the project frontage to the new HOA for the proposed development.  All common areas on the site will be maintained by an HOA (Condition No. 11).  

 

Based on the number of units and bedrooms, a total of ±96 parking spaces are required for each of the units and a total of five guest parking spaces are required.  All units have a minimum 20 foot driveway, with the exception of Buildings 1, 11, and 16.  Because the two bedroom unit relies on tandem parking to meet their minimum of two parking spaces, a condition is recommended to designate three surface parking lot spaces for each two-bedroom unit without a driveway.  The designated parking spaces should be closest to each respective unit (Condition No. 12).  A total of nine surface parking spaces are proposed.  Therefore, there should be sufficient parking for each of the units and for guest parking. 

 

Freestanding project identification signs are proposed at the entrances to the development (Exhibit H).  Code limits the size, height, and illumination to ensure compatibility with surrounding residential uses.  The use of natural rocks and decorative metal is consistent with the materials used within the project and the use of rockery walls throughout Northwest Reno (SUP finding g).

 

A conceptual wall/fence plan was provided.  Generally, the applicant is proposing a combination of six foot tall solid wood privacy fences between private yard areas and along the rear boundary of each LCE.  Open view fences are required for any yards that face open space areas within the McQueen Neighborhood Plan per RMC 18.08.406(c)(3) – (Hillside Development Standard).  While most fences shown on the plan meet this requirement, there are several locations that do not.  Prior to the approval of a final map, open view fences will be required wherever the private yard abuts an area considered open space for the purpose of hillside development requirements.  A majority of properties along Beaumont Parkway have open view fencing.  As such, a condition is recommended to require open view fencing along Beaumont Parkway to be consistent with the surrounding developments (Condition No. 13). 

 

Hillside Development and Grading: This site generally slopes from the northwest portion of the site to the southeast (Exhibit B).  Many of the significant slopes on this site were man-made by using fill to build the adjacent residential development, The Truckee Meadows Water Authority (TMWA) pump house, the former Northgate Golf Course equipment building, and Beaumont Parkway. Exhibit C shows that the slopes exceeding 30% primarily follow the edge of the surrounding developed areas.  The purpose of the hillside development ordinance is to protect naturally occurring slopes.  The applicant conducted a conservative analysis and included all existing slopes on the site rather than using the natural grade.  The table below shows the slope analysis

 

Slope Legend

Slope Range

% of Area

Area (acres)

0-15%

55.2

3.4

15.1-20%

11.2

0.7

20.1-25%

8.3

0.5

25.1-30%

9

0.6

>30%

16.4

1

TOTAL

100

6.2

 

Slopes generally fall below 15% on most of the site (±55.2%).  This is predominantly where the proposed development will fall.  Small portions of the site will encroach into the steeper slopes along the north and east boundaries of the site.  Additionally, steeper slopes that run through the middle of the site are proposed to be graded into a series of pads. 

 

A majority of the site sits lower than Beaumont Parkway and the properties to the north.  By cutting into the slopes along the north portion of the site and along Beaumont Parkway, the applicant is able to keep the grade of the site lower, which helps reduce the use of retaining walls and steeper slopes along the visible project boundaries.  It also assists in lowering the proposed units to protect the privacy and decrease the visual impact to the abutting residences.  Through a combination of cuts and fills of the steeper slopes abutting Beaumont Parkway and the TMWA pump house, the applicant is able to provide safe, adequate access to the site, while also ensuring an appropriate transition in grade to surrounding sites (Grading SUP finding b).  The southeast corner of the site will be filled in excess of ten feet and create significant slopes around the TMWA pump house and on the southern end of the site.  These slopes will be 3:1, which will allow for significant planting, the use of trees, and revegetation for erosion control rather than the use of rip-rap.  In addition to the landscape conditions discussed above, a condition is recommended to ensure all edges of created slopes are rounded and feathered to properly transition to adjacent natural slopes.  All slopes greater than 30 feet in height should be varied vertically and horizontally to avoid a flat engineered look.  Talus slopes, embedded boulders, rockery walls or other similar methods can also be used to break up these slopes (Condition No. 14).  This will ensure that all slopes will be stabilized using landscaping and more natural methods.  This will ensure a more visually appealing appearance along the project boundaries (Hillside SUP findings a, b, and e; Grading SUP finding a). 

 

Retaining walls are proposed throughout the site and are generally contoured to mimic the natural topography and add visual interest to the project.  The tallest retaining wall is ±11 feet and is located along the northern portion of the site near Building 5.  This wall will only be visible to those within the development and assists in lowering the overall grade of the site.  A lower overall site grade reduces the number of retaining walls used elsewhere and allows for the use of 3:1 slopes throughout the site.  Further, it allows the proposed buildings to be lowered, thereby reducing the visual impact on the existing residences located to the north.  A condition is recommended to make all retaining walls decorative.  All retaining walls facing the exterior of the site should be required to be rockery or have the appearance of random-patterned, hand-stacked, natural stone (Condition No. 15).  The applicant has provided two retaining wall concepts that would meet this condition (Exhibit I).  All retaining walls should be contoured to match the surrounding topography and provide visual interest (Condition No. 16) (Grading SUP finding a; Hillside SUP findings b, d, and e). 

 

The hillside development standards restrict density based on the existing slopes.  This is done in order to reduce the impacts of development on the natural terrain and limit environmental degradation and visual scarring of existing natural slopes.  As mentioned above, many of the significant slopes on the site were created as a result of surrounding development.  However, the applicant conducted their slope analysis using existing slopes, which results in a more conservative approach to development on the site.  Based upon the density reduction factors required by RMC 18.12.1605 – (Calculation of Density), a total of 57 units are allowed in the project and 48 are proposed. 

 

The code also requires a portion of the site to be dedicated as open space based upon the amount of slopes on the site.  Based on the calculations required by RMC 18.12.1607 – (Required Open Space) and the 2:1 ratio for development on 30% or greater slopes, a minimum of 1.9 acres of open space is required and ±2.13 acres are provided.  All open space areas will be required to be clearly delineated on the final map and will be deed restricted as permanent open space (Condition No. 17) (Hillside SUP findings c and d).  

 

Public Safety:  The Reno Police Department provided Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CEPTD) comments and noted a concern with the access into the project (Exhibit J).  This concern is addressed in the Traffic, Access, and Circulation section below.  No other major concerns were noted. 

 

The Reno Fire Department provided comments that all future development must comply with the 2012 Edition of the International Fire Code as amended and adopted by the City of Reno.  Such compliance shall include, but shall not be limited to, fire department access, fire sprinkler systems, fire alarm systems and fire hydrant placement. Fire access roads are required during construction meeting all standards for permanent Fire Department access roads with the exception of the surface, which is required to be an engineered compacted base material to support fire trucks and be resistant to wear from travel and weather.  The proposed project is located within three minutes (1.5 miles) of Fire Station 11 (TM findings 4, 9, and 10). 

 

Public Improvements: All necessary utilities to serve the project are in place or can be extended to the site (SUP finding c).  Prior to the approval of any final map, all necessary easements for utilities should be shown on the map (Condition No. 18).  Additionally, the final map should show any existing easements that currently encumber the site as relinquished or relocated to appropriate locations (Condition No. 19).  A preliminary Sanitary Sewer report was provided with the application and indicates that the downstream public infrastructure has sufficient capacity to serve the development while meeting all Public Works Design Manual (PWDM) criteria.  The sanitary sewer mains should be constructed within the private street section and designated as public (Condition No. 20).  According to the application, water service to the project will be provided by Truckee Meadows Water Authority (TMWA).  Prior to approval of each final map the applicant is required to provide proof that water rights necessary to serve the project have been obtained and have plans approved to construct all necessary water infrastructure to serve the project (Condition No. 21) (TM findings 1, 2, 3, and 10).

 

The proposed area of the project lies entirely within a FEMA unshaded flood zone x designation indicating the site to be outside of the 100 year flood zone.  A preliminary hydrology report was provided.  A final hydrology report will be required for each final map (Condition No. 22) (TM finding 8).

 

The geotechnical feasibility study provided by the applicant is based on an older geotechnical report. While the findings of the report demonstrate compliance with all standards in the PWDM, a final geotechnical report that demonstrates the project will meet or exceed the PWDM standards will be required prior to the approval of a final map (Condition No. 23) (TM Finding 8).

 

The plans show that utilities will be tied to existing infrastructure located in Beaumont Parkway.  The developer will be responsible for replacing roadway markings and striping affected or displaced by the pavement improvements prior to the approval of any certificate of occupancy (Condition No. 24).

 

Storm drain infrastructure located within the private alleys, drainage swales, and detention pond should be privately owned and maintained and clearly stated on the final subdivision map and improvement plans.  These items should also be subject to an operations and maintenance manual which details all operations and maintenance tasks, frequency of maintenance, access for maintenance, and a detailed description of the types of equipment that are anticipated to be necessary for the operations and maintenance of said tasks.  This manual should be adopted as policy by the HOA or equivalent (Condition No. 25).  Additionally, the applicant should be required to design appropriate access to the project site that complies with City storm water pollution standards and that will mitigate potential dirt track out issues onto public rights-of-way (Condition No. 26).  The applicant should also be required to provide plans that demonstrate that the project has been designed to provide adequate gravity flow and overland escape routes are provided for all roof tops and surface storm water collection and conveyance facilities in accordance with the PWDM (Condition No. 27).

 

Traffic, Access, and Circulation:  The applicant has provided a Project Access Analysis and has concluded that the proposed 48-unit condominium development will have a negligible traffic impact on the existing surrounding roadways.  The project access analysis includes a trip generation analysis, a roadway volume and speed survey, and a sight distance analysis to address the primary concerns related to the project site. 

The trip generation analysis states that the proposed project is anticipated to generate ±319 Average Daily Trips (ADT) with ±24 AM and ±30 PM Peak Hour Trips (PHT).  Beaumont Parkway is classified as a Minor Arterial, although its function is more appropriately designated as a Residential Collector since it carries approximately 3,600 vehicles per day.  The surrounding roadways currently operate at a Level of Service (LOS) B or better.  The proposed project will not change this LOS. 

 

The roadway volume and speed survey indicated that the speeds on Beaumont Parkway generally exceeded the posted speed limit by over ten miles per hour.  These speeds were utilized to analyze the required sight distance at the proposed primary road intersection with Beaumont Parkway.  The resulting sight distance analysis provided a recommendation to prohibit exiting left turn movements from the project site, since the required sight distance was not available to allow a safe left turn.  Therefore, the applicant should be required to design and construct a porkchop island at the project exit in order to eliminate that left turn movement.  Additionally, in order to help mitigate the speeds on Beaumont Parkway, staff recommends that the applicant design and construct two radar speed signs on Beaumont Parkway, one in each direction of travel (Condition No. 28).

 

Access to the site will be from Beaumont Parkway from a new proposed street that will end in a cul-de-sac with a number of private alleys.  The proposed primary street in the development includes parking stalls that will allow backing into the right of way of the primary street.  City code does not allow backing into public right-of-way (RMC 18.12.901(a) – Driveway Standards).  Therefore, all streets and alleys within the development should be designated as private.  All requirements for private streets, including the placement on a separate common area parcel, will be required (Condition No. 29).  The applicant should also include parking control signs and red painted curb in the final construction plans on the post curb side of the primary street.  Furthermore, the applicant should also include provisions in the CC&R’s to prohibit parking on the proposed primary street (Condition No. 30).  Prior to acceptance of the primary street cross section and configuration, the applicant should verify compliance with fire department access and engineering standards for circulation within the development.

Since access is proposed from Beaumont Parkway the developer should provide a construction management and access plan for the project prior to beginning construction (Condition No. 31).

 

A sidewalk is provided on both sides of the proposed street and on one side of each alley.  Connectivity is provided from the entrance of each unit to the alley.  The applicant has also proposed to extend the existing sidewalk along Beaumont Parkway from its current terminus to the Northwest corner of Beaumont Parkway and Clubhouse Drive.  Furthermore, pedestrian connectivity will be provided from the proposed project to the existing path system in the surrounding open space.  Therefore, safe pedestrian access will be provided within and adjacent to the site (SUP finding d).  A condition is recommended to require the applicant to work with the Washoe County School District to prepare a safe routes to school analysis prior to the approval of a final map (Condition No. 32) (TM findings 6 and 7).

 

Master Plan:  As proposed and with recommended conditions, the project appears to be consistent with the following applicable Master Plan policies and objectives:  The project is consistent with the Mixed Residential land use designation on the site ad, as proposed and with recommended conditions, the project is consistent with the following applicable Master Plan policies and objectives: H-9: The City should disperse housing types and sizes throughout the City, rather than concentrate similar housing types and sizes in certain area; H-13 new housing developments which provide pedestrian and bicycle access to reduce automobile use; H-14: The City should promote owner-occupied housing units; E-12: The City should make every effort to retain mature trees as part of the development process to continue to improve the City’s environment; OS-11: Trail access should be made available through access points; GI-7: The City should require that new development pay the fill cost of public improvements required by the development; WWW-7: encourage low water use landscape; T-1: Encourage pedestrian and bicycle access in residential areas; S-2: tentative maps forwarded to school district for review; P-1 safe and logical site access and circulation; P-2 placement of new lots off of collectors and local streets only; P-8 circulation system designed to minimize disruption of single family neighborhoods; CP-3 use of the Neighborhood Advisory Board for communication on projects; SD-4 interesting streetscapes in residential neighborhoods; SD-6 in new subdivisions garages should not dominate the streetscape; SD-7: abrupt changes in residential density should be discouraged.  Objective #1: Site Analysis; Objective #2: Significant Natural Features; Objective # 3: Platting Lots; Objective #4: Grading; Objective #5: Percent Natural State; Objective #6: Cut and Fill Slopes; and Objective #11: Compatibility.

 

The City is undergoing a comprehensive Master Plan update.  Initial findings from citizen engagement and housing demand modeling revealed that the City has an overabundance of property planned for single family residential and a greater variety of housing product types are needed.  The ReImagine Reno process also revealed that citizens preferred to live close to amenities such as parks, green space, and trails.  This project provides an alternative form of housing as condominiums and is located near numerous trails and dedicated open space (TM findings 4 and 5) (SUP finding b). 

 

McQueen Neighborhood Plan:  The proposed condominium development is consistent with the Multifamily land use designation McQueen Neighborhood Plan.  The project is consistent with the following neighborhood plan policies: Developers should be responsible for the construction of trails adjacent to their site; and where possible, the City should connect sidewalks and urban trails. 

 

General Code ComplianceAs proposed and with recommended conditions, the project is consistent with City Code (TM finding 5).

 

Other Reviewing Bodies

 

Washoe County District Health Department (WCHD): The applicant is required to comply with WCHD regulations regarding:  dust control, sewage disposal; domestic water supply; water system design; solid waste; vector control; water quality; and air quality management.  The applicant will also be required to comply with WCHD regulations regarding: use of low impact methods for landscape design and utilization of wind sensors to irrigate areas with turf. 

 

Washoe County School District:  Comments received from the School District indicate that this project is anticipated to generate approximately five new K-12 students (Exhibit K).  This project is located within the attendance zone area of Melton Elementary (two new students), Billinghurst Middle (one new student), and McQueen High Schools (two new students).  According to the school district, all schools will have sufficient capacity to accommodate the increase in students, with the exception of McQueen High School.  Current enrolment at McQueen High School is 1,729 students (108% of capacity).  With the proposed project, anticipated enrolment is ±1,731 students (108% of capacity).  A total of seven portable buildings (14 portable classrooms), provide additional capacity for 350 students. When accounting for the portable classrooms, the school will be at ±90% capacity.  Additionally, the new WC-1 funding source has provided a sustainable source for building and repairing schools for the Washoe County School District. There will be sufficient capacity in the surrounding schools to accommodate development (TM finding 4). 

 

Neighborhood Advisory Board:  This project was reviewed by the Ward 5 NAB on September 12, 2017.  Both NAB members and members of the public were concerned with increased traffic, the speed of traffic on Beaumont Parkway, the massing and scale of the proposed development, view obstruction, the appropriateness of condominiums near a single family residential neighborhood, the contribution of development to the Northgate Golf Course Special Assessment District, access to the surrounding open space, the impacts on schools, and the impact of the proposed site access configuration.  Access, traffic, project compatibility, school impact, pedestrian safety, and access to the surrounding open space are all addressed within the staff report.  City of Reno Finance Department and the Parks, Recreation, and Community Services Department confirmed that the subject site is not included in the Special Assessment District for Northgate Golf Course.  The NAB comments are included as Exhibit L

 

AREA DESCRIPTION

 

Land Use

Master Plan Designation

Zoning

North

Single Family Residential

Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Single Family Residential

SF9/MQ

South

Open Space

Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Open Space

OS/MQ

East

LDS Temple

Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Multifamily Residential

MF14/MQ

West

Open Space

Special Planning Area/McQueen Neighborhood Plan/Open Space

OS/MQ

 

Legal Requirements:

 

NRS 278.349(3)                            Tentative Map

RMC 18.06.405(e)(1)               Special Use Permit

RMC 18.06.405(e)(2)                            Special Use Permits for Hillside Development

RMC 18.06.405(e)(3)              Special Use Permits for Cut Slopes of 20 Feet or Greater in Depth or Fill Slopes Ten Feet or Greater in Depth.

 

Findings:

 

Tentative Map:  When issuing a decision on a tentative map, the planning commission shall consider the following:

 

(1)              Environmental and health laws and regulations concerning water and air pollution, solid waste disposal, water supply facilities, community or public sewage disposal and, where applicable, individual systems for sewage disposal;

 

(2)              Availability of water which meets applicable health standards and is sufficient for the reasonably foreseeable needs of the subdivision;

 

(3)              Availability and accessibility of utilities;

 

(4)              Availability and accessibility of public services such as schools, police and fire protection transportation, recreation and parks;

 

(5)              Conformity with the zoning ordinances, master plan, and elements thereof, except that if any existing zoning ordinance is inconsistent with the master plan, the zoning ordinance takes precedence;

 

(6)              General conformity with the governing body’s master plan of streets and highways.

 

(7)              Effect of the proposed subdivision on existing public streets and the need for new streets or highways to serve the subdivision;

 

(8)              Physical land characteristics such as flood plain, slope, soil; and

 

(9)              Recommendations and comments of those entities reviewing the tentative map pursuant to NRS 278.330 and 278.348.

 

(10)              Availability and accessibility of fire protection, including, but not limited to, the availability and accessibility of water and services for the prevention and containment of fires, including fires in wild lands; and

 

(11)              Submission by the subdivider of an affidavit stating that the subdivider will make provision for payment of the tax imposed by Chapter 375 of NRS and for compliance with the disclosure and recording requirements of subsection 5 of NRS 598.0923, if applicable, by the subdivider or any successor in interest.

 

Special Use PermitGeneral special use permit findings.  Except where specifically noted, all special use permit applications shall require that all of the following general findings be met, as applicable.

 

a.              The proposed use is compatible with existing surrounding land uses and development.

 

b.              The project is in substantial conformance with the master plan.

 

c.              There are or will be adequate services and infrastructure to support the proposed development.

 

d.              The proposal adequately mitigates traffic impacts of the project and provides a safe pedestrian environment.

 

e.              The proposed site location and scale, intensity, density, height, layout, setbacks, and architectural and overall design of the development and the uses proposed, is appropriate to the area in which it is located.

 

f.              The project does not create adverse environmental impacts such as smoke, noise, glare, dust, vibrations, fumes, pollution or odor which would be detrimental to, or constitute a nuisance to area properties.

 

g.              Project signage is in character with project architecture and is compatible with or complementary to surrounding uses.

 

h.              The structure has been designed such that the window placement and height do not adversely affect the privacy of existing residential uses.

 

Special Use PermitSpecial use permits for hillside development.  In order to approve a special use permit for hillside development according to Article XVI (Hillside Development) of Chapter 18.12, the decision-making body shall make the general special use permit findings and the following additional findings:

 

                1. The proposed project mitigates environmental degradation, including slope failure, erosion, sedimentation, and stormwater run-off;

 

                1. The proposed project utilizes grading practices that are appropriate for hillsides and designed to minimize the visibility of unsightly scarring;

 

                1. The proposed project provides open space based on hillside constraints;

 

                1. The proposed project adheres to applicable hillside development design standards and to master plan provisions related to development in sloped areas; and

 

                1. The proposed project’s site layout and design features adequately mitigate potential visual impacts of development near prominent ridgelines and within other visually prominent areas.

 

Special Use PermitSpecial use permits for cut slopes of 20 feet or greater in depth or a fill slope ten feet or greater in height.  In addition to the general findings in subsection (1) above, special use permits for cut slopes of 20 feet or greater in depth or a fill slope ten feet or greater in height shall require that one of the following findings be made:

 

a.              The slopes can be treated in a manner which does not create negative visual impacts.

 

b.              The grading is necessary to provide safe and adequate access to the development.